Wednesday, 18 November 2015

Vive Paris

This is a selection of vintage art posters of Females in mildly dominant and humorous poses illustrated in the classic French weekly magazine, La Vie Parisienne (Parisian life), which was founded in Paris in 1863 and published without interruption until 1970.

It was especially popular at the start of the 20th century. Originally, it covered novels, sports, theatre, music and the arts. In 1905, the magazine changed hands and it soon evolved into a mildly risqué erotic publication.

The artwork of La Vie Parisienne reflected the stylization of Art Nouveau  and Art Deco illustration, mirroring the aesthetic of the age. The largest collection of La Vie Parisienne magazine artwork in the UK is held by The Advertising Archives, a free-to-view resource holding cover and interior artwork of famed illustrators including George Barbier, Cheri Herouard, Georges leonnec and Maurice Milliere.

The historical La Vie Parisienne ceased to exist in 1970. A new magazine of the same name started in 1984 and is still in existence.

At this very painful time for the citizens of Paris, may they soon recover their renowned joie de vivre.

Sunday, 15 November 2015

Venus and the satyr

In this painting, created in 1671, a clearly fearful satyr is held and mocked by two putti before the seated Venus who, with her extended arm, prepares to pronounce on his fate. A container of wine spills on to the ground in a metaphor of flowing blood.

The work is by Filippo Lauro (1623 - 94), an Italian painter and draughtsman of the Baroque period, active mainly in Rome.

He was best known for his many, elegant and highly wrought 'cabinet' pictures of landscape and mythological subjects done on panel or copper, which are widely scattered in collections in Europe and North America. In addition, he painted large-scale decorative frescoes for some of the most eminent patrons in Rome.

Friday, 13 November 2015

The Art of Hand-Kissing

Hand-kissing as an art form, to be used along with courtly bows, flourishes of one's hat, and all the rest of the "bells and whistles" that go with courtly behaviour - but strictly only at The Lady's invitation.

The Reception ~ Arturo Ricci

The Suitor ~ Francesco Beda

The Admirer ~ Antonio Lonza

Galant Wooing: Courtly Company Playing Palour Games In The Salon ~ Adriano Cecchi 

The Proposal ~ Alois Heinrich Priechenfried

The First Encounter ~ Pio Ricci

The Kiss on the Hand ~ Gerolamo Induno 

Saturday, 7 November 2015

Warrior Dragon Queen

While I rarely feature digital art here, I was struck by this interesting fantasy piece called Court of the Crimson Queen. Set in a scene of medieval foreboding, a bound male prisoner kneels before the Warrior Dragon Queen as She contemplates his fate.

It is by an American graphic artist, Robert Gorske (aka Roademan) who describes himself as “an airbrush artist in the automotive field since 1981”, and who began working with Photoshop CS5 since 2011 for the pure enjoyment.

Wednesday, 28 October 2015

On His Knees Before Her

This charming picture of an eighteenth century gentleman kneeling in submission before a Lady is the work of the French water colour painter and illustrator, Pierre-Edmond Malassis (1875 - 1944), who was a pupil of Gustave Moreau, the great Symbolist painter.

It is one of a series of illustrations he created for a book called Night and the Time (or The Mornings of Kythera): Dialogue (1755) which was written by the eighteenth century French novelist, Claude Prosper Jolyot de Crébillon ("Crébillon fils" to distinguish him from his father), and published in Paris, 1924. He was a major author of what was called libertine literature which readily adapted tales and novels to the theatre.

The dialogue featured here is based on romantic banter between the Marquise Cidalise and the Count Clitandre. Situated in the privacy of her bedroom, they debate the fickle and inconstant nature of women and men.

Sunday, 25 October 2015

Her Cunning Skill

This enchanting painting is titled The Cunning Skill to Break a Heart. Certainly, the Lady is more than pleased with herself having put the hapless male suitor firmly in his place.

The work is by the English illustrator and painter, Eleanor Fortescue-Brickdale (1871 - 1945). Well-respected in her day as a talented illustrator of many books, she had the honour in 1902 of becoming the first female member of the Institute of Painters in Oils.

Her works were styled in the manner of the Pre-Raphaelites such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti or William Holman Hunt, using vibrant jewel like colours and representative 19th century subject matter.

Tragically, Brickdale's career was cut short when she suffered a stroke in 1938 and was unable to paint for the remaining 7 years of her life.